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RESELLING

General talk and Fake ID UK discussion
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wilk007 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:22 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:45 pm
Something more to add, analysed this recently and have changed our operation slightly. Some Inkjet printers may leave a mark in a certain place on an envelope when printing (might be a fault or intentional) - this mark can appear in a similar location and be a similar shape and size each time. The way around this is to clean the printer (which is quite a tricky task), or with Inkjet printers being so cheap nowadays to just buy another. Change the colour and size of your envelopes, and the font that you print on them with to ensure the sender remains anonymous. Change the styles every few deliveries, not for each entire batch of deliveries. Hand-writing addresses is not advisable.

Stamps may also be another factor that could lead to an identification being made. If you choose to use stamps, ensure you use regular design 1st or 2nd class stamps as post sent with limited print, or special design stamps is rare. You don't want to be caught out by such a silly thing.
The thing you're referring to is tracking dots which can uniquely identify a printer.

See https://www.eff.org/pages/list-printers ... cking-dots for which ones do and don't print tracking dots (often times you can't see them).
No I was talking about a malfunction with one of our printers that left ink in a certain place on envelopes but not regular paper.

I acknowledge this is also a problem but it seems to be almost unavoidable, so I've had to learn to live with it. However, I would suggest ignoring the leaflet that comes with a new printer that asks you to register it online as this is an easy way for the manufacturer to link it to you, if they offer a warranty you can just return it to where you got if from regardless of if you registered.

It's also good practice on all network connected printers to configure them not to access the Internet as they can spread malware round your network, or, call home and your manufacturer will know which IP address that serial number is connecting from. Some printers will let you do this with the printer settings, otherwise you can configure this on your router.
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:46 am
wilk007 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:22 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 7:45 pm
Something more to add, analysed this recently and have changed our operation slightly. Some Inkjet printers may leave a mark in a certain place on an envelope when printing (might be a fault or intentional) - this mark can appear in a similar location and be a similar shape and size each time. The way around this is to clean the printer (which is quite a tricky task), or with Inkjet printers being so cheap nowadays to just buy another. Change the colour and size of your envelopes, and the font that you print on them with to ensure the sender remains anonymous. Change the styles every few deliveries, not for each entire batch of deliveries. Hand-writing addresses is not advisable.

Stamps may also be another factor that could lead to an identification being made. If you choose to use stamps, ensure you use regular design 1st or 2nd class stamps as post sent with limited print, or special design stamps is rare. You don't want to be caught out by such a silly thing.
The thing you're referring to is tracking dots which can uniquely identify a printer.

See https://www.eff.org/pages/list-printers ... cking-dots for which ones do and don't print tracking dots (often times you can't see them).
No I was talking about a malfunction with one of our printers that left ink in a certain place on envelopes but not regular paper.

I acknowledge this is also a problem but it seems to be almost unavoidable, so I've had to learn to live with it. However, I would suggest ignoring the leaflet that comes with a new printer that asks you to register it online as this is an easy way for the manufacturer to link it to you, if they offer a warranty you can just return it to where you got if from regardless of if you registered.

It's also good practice on all network connected printers to configure them not to access the Internet as they can spread malware round your network, or, call home and your manufacturer will know which IP address that serial number is connecting from. Some printers will let you do this with the printer settings, otherwise you can configure this on your router.
I send handwritten letters each order 1 of the 7 of us selling is the designated writer and we all live in different areas so are sent from different post offices. (We do change our style of writing to our everyday writing)
Chinobey wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:43 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:46 am
wilk007 wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:22 pm


The thing you're referring to is tracking dots which can uniquely identify a printer.

See https://www.eff.org/pages/list-printers ... cking-dots for which ones do and don't print tracking dots (often times you can't see them).
No I was talking about a malfunction with one of our printers that left ink in a certain place on envelopes but not regular paper.

I acknowledge this is also a problem but it seems to be almost unavoidable, so I've had to learn to live with it. However, I would suggest ignoring the leaflet that comes with a new printer that asks you to register it online as this is an easy way for the manufacturer to link it to you, if they offer a warranty you can just return it to where you got if from regardless of if you registered.

It's also good practice on all network connected printers to configure them not to access the Internet as they can spread malware round your network, or, call home and your manufacturer will know which IP address that serial number is connecting from. Some printers will let you do this with the printer settings, otherwise you can configure this on your router.
I send handwritten letters each order 1 of the 7 of us selling is the designated writer and we all live in different areas so are sent from different post offices. (We do change our style of writing to our everyday writing)
Most commercial mail has printed addresses. Handwriting is something officials look for when picking which items to inspect.
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:21 pm
Chinobey wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:43 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:46 am


No I was talking about a malfunction with one of our printers that left ink in a certain place on envelopes but not regular paper.

I acknowledge this is also a problem but it seems to be almost unavoidable, so I've had to learn to live with it. However, I would suggest ignoring the leaflet that comes with a new printer that asks you to register it online as this is an easy way for the manufacturer to link it to you, if they offer a warranty you can just return it to where you got if from regardless of if you registered.

It's also good practice on all network connected printers to configure them not to access the Internet as they can spread malware round your network, or, call home and your manufacturer will know which IP address that serial number is connecting from. Some printers will let you do this with the printer settings, otherwise you can configure this on your router.
I send handwritten letters each order 1 of the 7 of us selling is the designated writer and we all live in different areas so are sent from different post offices. (We do change our style of writing to our everyday writing)
Most commercial mail has printed addresses. Handwriting is something officials look for when picking which items to inspect.
Officials look for handwritten letters really? Think of the thousands upon thousands of birthday cards and such that are sent daily most of which are handwritten the intent with the stealth method we use is to make it seem like a typical card especially with how thin the ids are fit in a standard envelope. Not sure if you are posting more than 1 so you have to use jiffy envelopes or what but we usually use a standard sized thin envelope.
Chinobey wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:09 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:21 pm
Chinobey wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 2:43 pm


I send handwritten letters each order 1 of the 7 of us selling is the designated writer and we all live in different areas so are sent from different post offices. (We do change our style of writing to our everyday writing)
Most commercial mail has printed addresses. Handwriting is something officials look for when picking which items to inspect.
Officials look for handwritten letters really? Think of the thousands upon thousands of birthday cards and such that are sent daily most of which are handwritten the intent with the stealth method we use is to make it seem like a typical card especially with how thin the ids are fit in a standard envelope. Not sure if you are posting more than 1 so you have to use jiffy envelopes or what but we usually use a standard sized thin envelope.
It's a well known fact, read / listen to American Kingpin if you're interested (it's about Ross Ulbricht, the Silk Road founder) - very long but the first few chapters are very informative.

Shipments from DNMs print addresses 99% of the time for this reason. There are millions of different items posted as commercial mail nowadays (think of all the different items on ebay), which makes it a challenge to guess what's inside a commercial looking shipment. Post is rarely used for personal correspondence nowadays so it's far easier to spot abnormalities in personal shipments.

It's basically gambling... You can go the easy way and take a gamble but one day LE might be on the ball and decide to make an example out of you. Fake IDs are getting more and more attention as they're becoming more and more common place - politically, everyone likes to come down hard on "trouble making teenagers" and it's something that will easily generate support for politicians.
Runin28 wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:17 pm
Chinobey wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 8:09 pm
Runin28 wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 5:21 pm


Most commercial mail has printed addresses. Handwriting is something officials look for when picking which items to inspect.
Officials look for handwritten letters really? Think of the thousands upon thousands of birthday cards and such that are sent daily most of which are handwritten the intent with the stealth method we use is to make it seem like a typical card especially with how thin the ids are fit in a standard envelope. Not sure if you are posting more than 1 so you have to use jiffy envelopes or what but we usually use a standard sized thin envelope.
It's a well known fact, read / listen to American Kingpin if you're interested (it's about Ross Ulbricht, the Silk Road founder) - very long but the first few chapters are very informative.

Shipments from DNMs print addresses 99% of the time for this reason. There are millions of different items posted as commercial mail nowadays (think of all the different items on ebay), which makes it a challenge to guess what's inside a commercial looking shipment. Post is rarely used for personal correspondence nowadays so it's far easier to spot abnormalities in personal shipments.

It's basically gambling... You can go the easy way and take a gamble but one day LE might be on the ball and decide to make an example out of you. Fake IDs are getting more and more attention as they're becoming more and more common place - politically, everyone likes to come down hard on "trouble making teenagers" and it's something that will easily generate support for politicians.
Fair enough then I will have to look at that but to be honest, if I ever get shut down for the handwritten post out of all of the options I will put the cuffs on myself because props to them.
Chinobey wrote:
Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:35 pm

Fair enough then I will have to look at that but to be honest, if I ever get shut down for the handwritten post out of all of the options I will put the cuffs on myself because props to them.
Yeah lmao, it's often tiny things like that which result in people getting caught - can be a struggle to get your head round.